How To Use The Writing Center

By Dru Macasieb

March 27th, 2018

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How to Cite in APA

By Dru Macasieb

Originally Written: March 26th, 2018

How to Cite a Website in APA:

Last, F. M. (Year, Month Date Published). Article title. Retrieved from URL

Example Satalkar, B. (2010, July 15). Water aerobics. Retrieved from http://www.buzzle.com

The format for Citing YouTube videos are as follows:

Last name, first initial. Second initial. OR Author username. (Year, Month
Day {of post} #sample_html ). Video title [Video file]. Retrieved from URL.

Example:
Epic Rap Battles of History. (2012, February 16). Mario Bros vs Wright Bros.
Epic Rap Battles of History Season 2 [Video file]. Retrieved from

My Information Diet

By Dru Macasieb

Originally Written: February 3rd, 2018

This year, especially this year, I am taking EXTREME ownership of my professional development in a multitude of ways.  One of the ways I am taking extreme ownership is by going on an information diet. Information diet is the idea that people should be conscious and selective of the information they consume (Johnson, 2015).  This year, my information diet consist of reading 2-3 books a month, watching YouTube videos that will add value and enhance my life, listening to more educational programming, and participating in professional development courses.

This month I am reading Think and Grow Rich by Napoleon Hill and The Compound Effect by Darren Hardy. I have also subscribed to Ted Talks and a couple of different YouTube channels such as Practical Psychology and Information Pill, both are about self-development. I have begun to listen to Bloomberg News as well as subscribed to a Podcast called the Law of Attraction. For professional development courses, I have enrolled in an edX class, Understanding Classroom Interaction.

Information diet is not only about what you let into your mind, but what you also keep out and minimize. I don’t watch movies and shows as much and have decreased listening to music in my car in favor of listening to TedTalks. It’s important to note that I do not completely eliminate leisure media, rather I toned it down for more meaningful media.

I believe that through this professional development plan, I can gain knowledge and success that I can share with those around me, especially my students.

References:

Johnson, C. (2015). The Information diet: A Case for conscious consumption. Sebastopol, CA: O’Reilly Media.

Appeals Process & Mitigating Circumstances

By Dru Macasieb

Originally written: February 1st, 2018

Hello Everyone,

Below is the appeals process for CCSD. This blog post also outlines what constitutes a mitigating circumstance. As a reminder, this is not an official guideline from the college, as current changes may not be reflected. Rather this is a resource that you may use that is to the best of my knowledge.  If you would like the official policy regarding this manner, please refer to the most current college catalog.

Below is direct verbiage from the college catalog 2017:

“A student dismissed for failing to meet the minimum standards of academic progress has the right to appeal the dismissal. The appeal must be done in writing and submitted in the form of a letter to the Dean (CC your Associate Dean). The letter must include the following:

  1. Explain the reasons why the student was unable to meet the minimum standards of academic progress including any mitigating circumstances;
  2. Provide documentation in support of any mitigating circumstances (i.e. court orders, emails, receipts, obituary, doctor’s note);
  3. Describe what has changed that will allow the student to be able to meet the minimum standards of academic progress; and
  4. Detail what the student will do moving forward to ensure that he or she will be successful in his or her program of study and will be able to achieve the requirements for graduation.

The appeal will be reviewed by an institution Appeals Panel. The student may be requested to meet with the Panel to discuss the appeal and provide additional information. Once the appeal letter and documentation are reviewed, the student will be notified if his or her appeal has been granted or denied.

If the appeal is granted, the student may be reinstated to his or her program of study. The student is placed on academic probation for one evaluation period, and during that time, access to financial aid is reestablished. If the appeal is denied, the student will not be allowed to reenter institution nor will the student be allowed to transfer to an affiliated institution within the system.

Mitigating circumstances are those conditions which the student has little control over, and most often have an adverse effect on academic progress. Mitigating circumstances must be documented and are limited to the list below:

  1. Death of an immediate family member;
  2. Illness of an immediate family member where the student Is the primary caretaker or is the primary source of financial support;
  3. Student illness requiring hospitalization;
  4. Abusive relationship;
  5. Prolonged divorce proceeding;
  6. Previously undocumented disability;
  7. Work-related transfer during the evaluation period;
  8. Change in work schedule during the evaluation period;
  9. The unexpected loss of employment;
  10. Natural disasters
  11. Financial hardship such as foreclosure or eviction; and
  12. Loss of transportation where there is no alternative transportation.”

Please refer to the college catalog for official guidelines as this site is an unofficial guide.

Dropping From School

By Dru Macasieb (March 2, 2017)

It is not recommended to disrupt your academic journey, however, we do understand that sometimes students need to for various reasons. Here is what you need to know before dropping from school.

NOTE: In order to remain an active student at CCSD you must have a class assigned. If you drop your one and only class, you will be may be dropped from the college.

Discuss Dropping with your Associate Dean First

Students should first discuss dropping with their associate dean so that he or she can advise you on possible ways to overcome challenges so that your academic journey does not get disrupted. Another good reason to discuss dropping with your associate dean is so that he or she can advise you on the best way to drop with minimal consequences. 

Consequences of Dropping A Class

Dropping a class is not as simple as it sounds. It comes with consequences.

  1. If you have attended any classes, even logging in once, you will be charged.

Because CCSD is an accelerated environment, you will be charged for any portion of class you attend, either online or on-ground. Dropping during the first week, you can still get a “W” grade for withdrawn. It will charge your student account a prorated amount, credit units will be factored in your course completion percentage, however, the “W” grade not be factored in your grade point average calculation.

Dropping after the first week will garner you an automatic grade of “F.”

1. If you have a scholarship, you will lose it. Please read your scholarship documentation.

Scholarships from CCSD have very specific guidelines, one of them being that you complete your academic journey without breaks. Remember, scholarships get factored into your student account after you have finished your program. Kinda off topic, but there is a minimum of 3.0 GPA required for scholarships.

2. CCSD does not offer a “time off” or “leave of absence.”

If you take a “time off” from your academic journey, you will be dropped. When you decide to come back from your “time off” you must reapply to the college (again) and go through the enrollment process as well as the financial aid process (again).  Please note, students are not guaranteed to be accepted upon enrollment, which is why you must reapply for admissions.

3. You may not be able to come back to school right away due to the possibility of classes (that you need) not being available.

When students drop or fail a course it sends them off their scheduled track. We can no longer guarantee graduation date or course availability. However, we do our best to schedule you as effectively as possible. The sooner you finish, the better it is for both parties.

4. Similar to #3 above, if you drop during weeks 3 and 4, you may not be able to return to the mod after next.

Everything goes through a process. When students drop we have to process your drop paperwork. It goes through the associate deans, the registrar’s office, financial aid, and the business office (to name a few). Re-entering also goes through a process. We cannot re-enter a student if the student has not been completely processed through drop side. Because of these lengthy processes, students who drop in weeks 3 or 4 may not be able to re-enter until the mod after the next one (for instance you drop in week 3 in mod 1, you probably not be able to re-enter until mod 3).

5. If you drop, you will not maximize your financial aid (Title IV funding).

We want you to maximize your student loan. When students do not maximize their student loans, it causes them to refund unused amounts. Students end up reaching their borrow limits and have to borrow additional funds from a private lender to compensate for the missing federal funds. I know this may sound confusing, it best to speak with your financial aid adviser on this topic.

6. If you are receiving VA benefits, you may be required to pay them back.

The Veteran Affairs distributes education benefits depending on enrollment factors (i.e. full-time, part-time, on-ground, online etc.). Depending on the nature of your circumstances, the VA may decide to recoup any benefits distributed based on non-attendance or failures aka “F” that the student received because of non-participation.

7. Other charges involved with dropping.

Students that drop must return their laptop, any outstanding books, and any other school property in their possession. Failure to do so in a timely manner will create a charge in their student account.

When you drop there is a $150 admin for processing your drop.

8. Upon the last day of attendance, students will enter student loan repayment after six months for federal loans. 

As a reminder, be sure to speak with financial aid to find out who your student loan servicer is and communicate with them regarding repayment plans. Please note this grace period is for federal loans only, not private loans.

Conclusion

It is best not to drop and work with your instructor and associate dean to overcome obstacles. If you have to no better choice but to drop, you associate dean will provide you with guidance as to how to best approach dropping with minimal consequences.

What is Web Accessibility?

By Dru Macasieb (March 1, 2017)

Web accessibility means allowing everyone the opportunity to access and utilize digital resources on the web. This compromises of creating hardware, software, and web content that can assist differently abled people. We are all not created equal therefore, some people have difficulty using the web due to differences in visual, auditory, physical, speech, cognitive and neurological abilities (Katsanos, Tselios, Tsakoumis, and Avouris, 2012).

A web page that is accessible, is one that benefits a spectrum of differently abled people. From users and developers to people with diverse needs and preferences, web accessibility empowers individuals and creates an environment of inclusiveness.

What is the importance of creating a website that follows accessibility guidelines?

Having accessibility guidelines is important because it allows for universal access to all, thus creating the same opportunities for everyone. Two key guidelines to follow are:

  1. Web design should be flexible and adaptable
  2. Accessible through different mediums such as mobile devices or assistive technologies

What is the difference between a website that is accessible and one that is not?

A website that is accessible recognizes the current trends and technology, as well as design, that allows for maximum participation, and makes diligent efforts to provide reasonable accommodation for all. A website that is not accessible ignores the fact that many people are differently abled, thus does not provide flexible and adaptable content.

References:

Katsanos, C., Tselios, N., Tsakoumis, A., & Avouris, N. (2012). Learning about web accessibility: A project-based tool-mediated approach. Education and Information Technologies, 17(1), 79-94. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10639-010-9145-5