Ted Talk Review: Brene Brown

By Dru Macasieb
January 11, 2017

https://embed.ted.com/talks/lang/en/brene_brown_on_vulnerability

Brene Brown gives an awesome Ted Talk regarding the power of vulnerability. In her research on human connections (love).

She found that the difference between people who have a strong sense of worthiness and those that do not is simply the belief that they are worthy of it (deserving). She discuss how these type of people have certain traits:

  • the courage to be imperfect
  • the compassion to be kind to oneself first
  • and the ability to create connections as a result of authenticity (being truthful to who you really are).

She dubbed these people with a strong sense of worthiness as “Whole-Hearted.” These people fully embrace vulnerability, and believe that we makes them vulnerable made them beautiful.

Those who were felt unworthy, struggled with fear and shame. By making their vulnerabilities come to light, they become shameful, and that shame gives them a sense of unworthy of connection. So what happens, is that they begin to fear anything that makes them shameful, in a sense, they fear being imperfect.

“To let ourselves be seen, deeply seen, vulnerably seen; to love with our whole hearts even though there’s no guarantee… to practice gratitude and joy, in those moments of terror… is to believe that we’re enough (worthy of being loved despite being imperfect). Because when we work from a place that says “I’m enough” then we stop screaming and start listening, we’re kinder and gentler to the people around us, and to ourselves.”

In Danger of Being Dropped

By Dru Macasieb

Originally Written: January 9th, 2017

Students need to log into Canvas at least 4 days a week, preferably on Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday of the week. Friday, Saturdays, and Sunday are optional, however, it is best to log in and complete the daily checkpoints on those days, as more than 4 daily checkpoints correct in a week, turns into extra credit.

Students that do not login consecutively or post attendance for more than 5 days are placed on an attendance watch list.

Students may be dropped for:

  • not attending online or on-ground for the first week of the mod
  • failing to attend online and/or on-ground for 14 consecutive days
  • poor attendance or academic performance, as recommended by a school offical

Dropping is not automatic as not all students’ circumstances are the same and there are various factors involved in this process. Therefore, students must take the initiative to communicate with the education department to inform us of their situation, and if they wish to remain enrolled or would like to drop.

If you need to drop from the college please contact the education department as soon as possible. For best results please send an email that:

  1. States you would like to drop
  2. Give a reason for dropping. Be detailed and specific as possible so that someone may give you the best possible advisement, provide you with possible alternatives to dropping, provide you advisement on how dropping will affect your academic and financial aid status, and provide you with advisement on re-entering
  3. Provide your availability so that we may schedule the best time for an exit interview and to drop off books and your laptop  (to avoid additional charges).

Note: If you drop in the middle of a Mod you will receive an “F” grade. Please visit this review the site “Consequences of Failing a Class

Do Not Fear the Unknown, Take Action to Shape the Future.

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Do not fear what has not happened yet. Worrying will not do anything it will just stress you out. It is normal to fear the unknown. Your fate is unknown, it is uncertain. But then again everyone’s fate is unknown.

This does not mean to be still as you wait for your fate. Instead, act on things that may affect your future. Create positive connections that demonstrate your honesty, courage, morality, responsibility, and selfless service. Actions will shape your fate.

Consequences of Failing a Class

By Dru Macasieb

Originally Written: December 16th, 2016

All students, including VA students, must progress satisfactorily toward meeting graduation requirements. Academic progress is measured in two ways: (a) grade point average, and (b) course completion. The academic progress of each student will be reviewed at the end of every term. A student is considered to be making academic progress if his or her grade point average is above the minimum requirement and the student has successfully completed at least 67% of the credits attempted, otherwise known as the completion rate standard. The evaluation points, grade point average standard, and the completion rate standard are provided in the table listed.

  • Required Evaluation Point and Minimum GPA with 67% of Grades Completed for Associate’s Programs
    • First Term (4 Months/Mods)    1.0
    • Second Term                         1.5
    • Third Term +                         2.0
    • Graduation                            2.0

The consequences of failing a course can be detrimental to your academic future. 

The consequences of failing a course are as follows:

  • You will waste time and resources
  • You will have to retake the course
  • You basically paid to get an F
  • You will be charged for retaking the course (so basically one F will cost you twice as much!)
  • Your GPA will significantly drop
  • Your graduation date will be pushed further

Consequences of a trend of failing courses:

  • Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) standards apply to all students at a college.
  • Failure to achieve a 2.0 GPA for each term will put you on Academic Probation, called a Financial Aid Warning Status (FAWS)
  • Failure to complete 67% of credits attempt will also put you in a FAWS
  • Once in FAWS you need to demonstrate positive progress by having 2.0 or above GPA for a term (which is 4 months).

So what happens if I get dropped for not achieving Satisfactory Academic Progress?

  • Financial aid may stop loaning you funds for your education with us.
  • You will be dropped from the college and cannot attend at our college.
  • Your chances of future financial aid benefits may be in jeopardy.
  • For VA students, you may be decertified from the VA benefits program and you may have to pay them back.
  • If not in school, you will have to repay any student loans after 6 months.
  • If you do not pay student loans and go into default, it will harm your credit score and the government may garnish your wages and intercept any tax refunds.

OPINION: Why You Should Not Fail A Course

By Dru Macasieb

Students that have a history of poor academic performance at ANY school may be denied enrollment based on multiple variables which include: GPA, grades, financial aid borrowing history, and repayment history to name a few.

The reason this may happen is that, when colleges admit students, they are accepting reasonable responsibility to educate, graduate, and place these students in careers related to their field of study, as well as ensure that graduates make payments to their student loans. This is why college typically asks for transcripts. If a student’s transcripts have a history of poor academic performance (like a low GPA, or its plagued with Ds and Fs, or they have taken many courses but have not completed a degree), the student may be denied admission as this becomes a liability for the school.

The school’s financial aid department will also see how much money a student has borrowed, thus far, and can deny a student admission based on the amount of debt the student has acquired versus the amount the student needs to graduate. For example:

  • Say you went to ABC College and racked up $25,000 in student loans.
  • You apply at XYZ College, but in order to complete an associate’s degree, it will cost $50,000.
  • The total amount the student will owe after graduation will be $75,000 for an associate’s.

The school will be responsible to educate, graduate, and place student in careers related to their field of study, as well as ensure that student make payments to their the student loan (as default rate is also known as the rate in which students’ do not pay their loan on time, is also a metric that a school must achieve).

This is why it is crucial to maintain satisfactory academic progress (SAP). Schools that are impacted (have a surplus of applicants) often deny students based on academic performance at other schools (including High School).

If you are struggling with achieving good grades and attending class, I recommend speaking with your school’s student services, your area of study’s department head (like the associate dean), or any school staff in the academic department. The worst thing a student can do is nothing.

 

 

 

Changing Your Schedule

By Dru Macasieb
Originally Written: December 10th, 2016
Any kind of change to your schedule will put you off track, and we can no longer guarantee full-time status,  4.0 credits per mod, or the maximization of financial aid. Best rule of thumb, do not fail a class or change your schedule.
Dropping
  • If a student does not have a class, they will become a drop.
  • If you do not attend the first week of class both online and on-ground, you may be dropped
  • If you do not attend for 14 consecutive days, you will be dropped (both online and on-ground).
  • If you drop the first week, without posting attendance on-ground or online, you will not be charged or get a grade.
  • If you drop the first week, but attend any portion (on-ground or online), you will be charged (should be pro-rated) and will get a “W” Grade.
  • If you drop after the first week, will receive an automatic letter grade of “F”
  • Tip: After the first week, might as well finish the course and try as best as possible to get an D or better.
  • It is always better to drop at the end of your term* because when you do, you do not increase your student debt!**
Online
  • To be considered and on-ground student, you must take 51% of your courses on ground. Vice-versa for online students.
  • Students can take an online class only if they are at or above a 2.5 GPAor with special approval from their associate Dean.
  • If you need to be put online for the mod, the last day to enroll for online classes is Tuesday of the first week (that’s if a class you need is available and there is seats open). No exceptions.
  • If students want to switch to completely online they will be dropped from CCSD and must apply to  Independence University (out sister school).
  • If you have an online class you must take it and pass so that you don’t not go off track.
Switching Day to Evening and Vice-versa 
  • In order to switch you must switch before the mod starts (the week before)
  • You can only switch if the classless you need are available, if they are not available available you cannot switch.

 

Beautiful Are We

By Dru Macasieb

Beautiful are we
Woven by threads of diversity

United by hate
We stand as one
Beautiful as the Venus sun

An opportunity manifested
By uneducated minds
Resilience requested
As commonality binds

Us through the threat
of a symbol of hate
We come together
To agitate

A system so broken
It can’t be fixed
Reinvention
Should do the trick

We live in a land
Supposedly free
Nation so grand
Beautiful are we.

Canvas on the Go!

By Dru Macasieb

October 3rd, 2016

Canvas by Infrastructure has, by far, been the best Learning Management System (LMS) I’ve ever encountered. Partly because of its ease of use and mobile friendly approach. This post is about using Canvas on your mobile device though the Canvas App, viewing Canvas on your mobile browser, and using the SpeedGradeApp.

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Access your courses on the go!

Canvas App

The Canvas App can b downloaded in the App Store or Google Play store. From an instructors point of view, the Canvas app is pretty limited to viewing and posting to discussions boards, reading Canvas mail, and viewing already entered grades. Personally, I mostly use this from the student side of things such as: doing discussions, looking up assignments, taking quiz, and viewing grades. However, having this app from an instructor point of view does come in handy as you can see what your Canvas app classroom would look like from a student’s perspective

Mobile Browsers

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Be sure to enter our campus: CEHE

What I like about Canvas is that it is mobile friendly. One can access the entire Canvas site using a mobile device like a smart phone or tablet. The best way to do this is by bookmarking Canvas on your mobile device. You’ll have full access to Canvas as if you were working on your laptop. Some of the neat features:

  • You can view assignments, make comments, and grade right from you device
  • You can edit and update assignments, exams, and pages
  • Anything you can do on a personal computer, you can do on your mobile device

SpeedGrader App

The SpeedGrader App is available on iOS tablets (iPads) and all Android devices. This app allows access to your grade book, where you can grade discussions, assignments, and assessments. It has a more streamlined approached than mobile browsing as it skips the the rest of Canvas (modules, pages, etc.) in favor of focusing on the grade book.  I highly suggest to use download this app as it makes grading on the go easier.

Conclusion

Canvas is an amazing LMS order to remain relevant in today’s competitive workforce, it is important for us to accept and embrace new technology. The Canvas App is great for students but its limited functionality makes it okay for instructors. Viewing it on a mobile browsers, is the same thing as viewing it from a personal computer, therefore bookmarking it as a no brainer.  The SpeedGrader App, is my favorite tool to use as it makes grading on the go quick and easy, however, the only set back is that its only available on iPads and Androids, (sorry iPhones). In the end, it may be more convenient to work on your laptop, but learning how to work in the mobile arena my prove useful during times when your laptop is not readily available.